Eearth Culture
making western society sustainable

Eearth Celebrations

Eearth New Year - Eearth Cosmos - Eearth Full Moon Rise

Eearth New Year
16 July
Find out about the next Eearth New Year Ceremony

Most people in the West associate January 1st as the beginning of the New Year.

Yet in reality, the use of any particular date for the beginning of the New Year is an arbitrary choice.

This is because a year is the time it takes for the Earth to circle the sun, and there is no place on a circle that offers a natural starting point.

Around the world, New Year's day is celebrated on many different days of the year. The Chinese celebrate it in Fenruary, the Persians in March, the Indians in July.

Eearth's New Year is 16 July and the minute of the end of one annual cycle and the beginning of the next is 9.29 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time (AEST).

What is the significance of 9.29 pm AEST on 16 July?

At that time, in 1945, and in New Mexico, the first even nuclear explosion was detonated. This event is significant because it is one of the instances that is identified as the Anthropocene Epoch.

It is yet to be decided if the plutonium contamination of the nuclear bomb test will be selected as the official marker of the Anthropocene Epoch - that decision could be a few years away.

Until such time as the official agreement about the Anthropocene is resolved, 16 July is Eearth's 'interim' New Year - subject to change, if necessary.

The Gadget: the first ever nuclear bomb, detonated 6.29 am 16 July, 1945. Miliseconds after detonation, the fireball 200 meters high.

It is fitting to align the Eearth New Year with the beginning of the Anthropocene Epoch, as Eearth seeks to help foster the creation of a subsequent era, where humans are in balance with nature. We refer to this subsequent Epoch as the Longfuturocene. The sooner that starts, the better.

There are many prognostications about the world ending in fire due to Climate Change, Armageddon, Nuclear War, etc.

So, it is refreshing that Eearth has created a narrative for the Anthropocene, in which the fireball occurs at the beginning of the story, and leaves the end date for humanity to be decided deep into the Long Future.

<< Watch this 5 minute documentary about the Trinity Bomb Test.

Eearth Cosmos Ceremony
14 June

News story about the new world atlas of artificial night sky brightness.

According to the 2016 paper - The new world atlas of artificial night sky brightness - about 30% of humans will never see the Milky Way from their homes due to night sky light pollution. The image above shows the atlas of light pollution.

Eearth Culture believes that being able to see the Milky Way at night is an integral part of the human experience, and this night sky pollution is an important psychological component of the global sustainability crisis.

Being able to see the cosmos is important for helping people to understand their place in the universe, and more importantly, their role on Earth.

The Eearth Cosmos Celebration takes place on 17 June. This date is ostensibly the date when the Earth's orbit places it on the side of the sun closest to the galactic core. This means that on these nights more of the Milky Way will be visible.

If for only one night, Eearth proposes that people take the opportunity - such that it exists - to visit a dark night sky where the Milky Way is clearly visible, and spend the night under the stars.

Full Moon Rise Ceremony
(approx monthly)
Find out about the next Eearth Full Moon Rise

The Moon is a great leveler of humans - it joins us together across space and time. The Moon looks the same, no matter where we are; a full Moon in Malaysia occurs at the same time as a full Moon in Australia, for example. The Moon has looked the same to all humans over the entire course of human history.

So, when Shakespear wrote The moon's an arrant thief, And her pale fire she snatches from the sun, he was referring to the Moon that looked identical to the Moon that we see today.

Note: the Eearth Full Moon Rise ceremony is can be held a day either side of the official full moon night. Click here to get the latest info.

- Many ancient and contemporary beliefs hold ceremonies to celebrate the Moon phases. Humans have been holding Full Moon parties for thousands of years!

- In many organisms, various phases of their growth cycle are time with the lunar cycles. For gardener wanting the benefit of this, consider Moon Planting.

- The Moon offers a visible reminder that we do not just live in society, but we are part of an ancient natural system that has been here long before us.

- The Moon is dead, inert, lifeless, reminding us that life is the exception, not the rule, in our solar system.

- Viewed from Earth, the Moon is exactly the same relative size as the sun. This can be observed during a full lunar eclipse, where the Sun is hidden by the Moon, but the Sun's corona remains visible. Also, the rotation of the Moon about its own axis has exactly the same period as the rotation of the Moon around the Earth, and this explains why the Moon always faces Earth with the same side.

These two cosmic coincidences give us pause to consider the improbability of the existence of life on Earth. It should give us cause to act in a manner that fosters life on Earth.

The Moon has a huge influence on living things as the influence of its gravity moves trillions of tonnes of sea water around, causing the the rise and fall of the tides.

The tides, caused by the influence of the Moon's gravity, can be harnessed to provide clean renewable energy.

Tidal Energy and can be created by machines such as the one in the picture, below.

Let us turn off the fossil fuels and turn on the tidal energy - in ways that doesn't cause environmental harm.

Continued...

The Moon has a huge influence on living things as the influence of its gravity moves trillions of tonnes of sea water around, causing the the rise and fall of the tides.

The tides, caused by the influence of the Moon's gravity, can be harnessed to provide clean renewable energy.

Tidal Energy and can be created by machines such as the one in the picture, below.

Let us turn off the fossil fuels and turn on the tidal energy - in ways that doesn't cause environmental harm.

- The full Moon floods the Earth with light, making landscapes and seascapes visible in the middle of the night.

- We can learn about the condition of the Earth by viewing sunlight that is reflected from the Moon, from the Earth. Put another way, 'Earth Shine' is light from the sun that is reflected from the Earth's surface, to the Moon and then back to us.

- Joined with the solstices and the equinoxes, the full and new Moon give Eeartheans 28 instances every year to celebrate living on such an awesome planet.

So, every time you see a new Moon or a full Moon, think of Eearth.

Check the lunar calendar below to plan your next celestial celebration.

 

 

 

 

Earth and the Moon seen from L1, a point in space 1.5 million kilometers away where the gravitational force of the sun and the Earth cancel each other out.